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THE BREAKOUT SESSIONS and CONFERENCE BOOKING

Please note that you are only eligible to attend this conference if you are a member of staff or a PhD student in your final year of study at the University of Brighton or one of its partner institutions

Please read the details of the breakout sessions below, and register using the online conference booking at the bottom of the screen. (You can scroll back up the screen if you need to refer back to the breakout session information while completing the online registration form).

Morning breakout sessions 10.45 to 12.15 – choose ONE of the following sessions:

1) Top tips for confident networking (all disciplines)
Facilitator(s):Dr Gem Stapleton, CEM and Francesca Anderson, The Research Office

Being a skilled networker can help you to generate and share ideas and insights, obtain access to expertise, test new ideas and get feedback, raise your research profile and identify potential research collaborations. This session will show you how to network and follow up effectively and will outline the strategies, boundaries, protocols and politics involved in both a UK and international context.

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FULLY BOOKED
2) How to get published (Part I): from idea to manuscript (all disciplines)
Facilitator(s): Dr Peter Cragg, PABS and Dr Jayne Raisborough, SASS

This practical session and the linked Part II afternoon session will help you to develop your ability to write and publish in academic journals. Part I will show you how to get started on the publishing process from your initial idea. It will help you to: • Understand writing processes and strategies and develop confidence in your ability to write and publish • Identify your audience and learn about the publishing process

NOTE TO DELEGATES – How to get published (Parts I and II) are intended to go together so you may wish to book a place on Part II if you book Part I

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3) Connecting with communities: social engagement and research
David Wolff, Director, Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP)

This session will consider what we mean by ‘social engagement’ and how local communities can both inform research and gain direct benefit from it. Since its inception in 2003, CUPP (http://www.brighton.ac.uk/cupp/) has initiated nearly 200 knowledge exchange projects, and these can provide exciting opportunities for researchers. The session will also feature the experiences of researchers who have won the university's Research Sabbatical scheme Social Engagement Award.

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4) Beyond boundaries: the benefits of cross-disciplinary research (all disciplines)
Facilitators: Professor David Nash, SET and Professor Matteo Santin, PABS

To understand our increasingly complex world requires examination from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Cross-disciplinary research can allow us to integrate data, methodologies, perspectives, and concepts in order to advance fundamental understanding or to solve real world problems. This session will show you how cross-disciplinary research can open up new areas of research and will discuss the benefits and challenges involved.

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5) Manage your research profile with Converis (the university’s new research information management system) (All disciplines)
Facilitators: Betsy Brewer, Information Services & Ingrid Pugh, Research Office

This session will introduce you to Converis, a new university system that will allow you to manage your research publications or outputs and to combine these with other information such as research grant data to create your CV. Converis links to the university’s repository (UBR), the HR system, ePrints and online research databases to provide the university with a useful research management information tool, as well as providing content to the university websites.

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1st afternoon breakout sessions 1.00 to 2.30 – choose ONE of the following sessions:

FULLY BOOKED
6A) Dragons’ Den (all disciplines) – Participant
Friendly Dragons: Professor Richard Faragher, PABS, Professor Ann Moore, Health Professions and Anne Boddington, Dean, Faculty of Arts

Have you got a good idea for a grant application, but would welcome some feedback and advice from an expert panel of friendly, non-fire-breathing Dragons on how to take it forward? So that you get the best possible quality feedback, we will need you to submit a 2 page outline of your research idea prior to the conference (a form will be sent to you to complete a few weeks beforehand).

All participants and observers will be asked to sign a confidentiality/non-disclosure clause.

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6B) Dragons’ Den (all disciplines) – Observer
Friendly Dragons: Professor Richard Faragher, PABS, Professor Ann Moore, Health Professions and Anne Boddington, Dean, Faculty of Arts

If you’re not quite ready to face the friendly Dragons with your own research idea, you may wish to participate in the Dragons’ Den as an observer instead and pick up tips on how to put together a successful grant application. Note that all participants and observers will be asked to sign a confidentiality/non-disclosure clause

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7) Mining for gold: finding the right information for your research (All disciplines)
Facilitator: Peter Coyne, Information Services

The key to being an efficient researcher is knowing about the best, most recent and relevant information sources to search for your topic. This practical hands-on session will show you a number of methods to help search for information to support your research, using university resources and also Google Scholar. It will also demonstrate tools to help you keep up to date with relevant, new articles as they are published.

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FULLY BOOKED
8) How to get published (Part II:) From manuscript to publication (all disciplines)
Facilitator(s): Dr Peter Cragg, PABS and Dr Jayne Raisborough, SASS

Part II of this session covers the next stage in the publishing process and follows on from Part I. It will help you to:
• Understand the style and structure of academic journals and how to choose the right journal
• Respond effectively to reviewers’ comments

NOTE TO DELEGATES – How to get published (Parts I and II) are intended to go together so you may wish to book a place on Part I if you book Part II

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9) Reaching your potential: how to develop your research career (all disciplines)
Facilitator(s): Professor Huw Taylor, SET and Dr Jonathan Sapsed, Brighton Business School

What knowledge, behaviours and attributes make a successful researcher and encourage them to realise their potential? This session will consider the early career researcher’s developing career journey including such topics as finding your identity as a scholar, team working, managing your PI, putting your ideas forward, effective networking, the protocols of academic life, managing your review meeting and the psychology of groups.

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SESSION CANCELLED
10) Working with vulnerable participants and sensitive topics (all disciplines)

It is essential that researchers conduct their work with integrity, and respect the rights and dignity of all those who are involved in or affected by their research while ensuring the physical, social and psychological well-being of participants. This session will highlight the issues involved and provide guidance on good practice.

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SESSION CANCELLED
11) Commercialising your research: is it worth it? (all disciplines)

Moving the results of your research into the commercial world is not an easy option. How do you assess whether it has value; where are the possible markets and investors, what are the risks involved? The university has been looking at ways in which this whole process can be made easier for those who want to explore this route. This session is designed to give you an introduction to the new policy and enable you to think about the potential value of your research.

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2nd afternoon breakout sessions 3.00 to 4.30 – choose ONE of the following sessions:

12) Social media for academics: how Twitter, Facebook and other technologies can enhance your research (all disciplines)
Facilitator: Adam Bailey, Information Services

Social media are increasingly used by academics to publicise their research, to network, to improve citation rates and to collaborate. This session will show you how technologies such as blogs, Facebook, Twitter plus others such as Zotero and CiteULike can support scholarly communication, promote publications and events and enhance your research profile.

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13) Preparing your proposal: how to write a Research Council bid (all disciplines)
Facilitators: Professor Jonathan Woodham, Faculty of Arts and Terri Epps & Tony Ingliss, Research Office

This session will consider the components of a Research Council proposal and outline the university’s bid approval process. It will also discuss how to write a persuasive and fundable proposal that takes the reviewers’ perspective into account.

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SESSION CANCELLED
14) In the spotlight: media training for academics (all disciplines)

Effective dissemination of your research is becoming increasingly important: for attracting funding; for promoting the university; for the REF; for engaging with the public, with current and prospective students and with other researchers. But how can you best promote your work? How do you avoid the pitfalls? This session will provide you with top tips for dealing with the media.

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15) Maximising the impact of your research (all disciplines)
Facilitators: Professor Neil Ravenscroft, SET and Dr Catherine Moriarty, Faculty of Arts

Increasingly researchers are expected to demonstrate an awareness of the wider environment and context in which their research takes place, to actively engage with the public, and to identify potential beneficiaries from the outset. They are also required to disseminate their research outcomes widely to academic, user and public audiences and to exploit results to secure social and economic impact. This session will show you how to plan ahead for maximum impact: what do you need to know before you start, how will you measure impact and how will you articulate the benefits of your research?

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16) The Concordat for early career researchers.... your chance to contribute (all disciplines)
Facilitator: Professor Andrew Lloyd, Dean, Faculty of Science and Engineering

The Concordat is an agreement between the funders and employers of researchers in the UK that sets out the expectations and responsibilities of researchers themselves, their managers, employers and funders. This session will outline the main elements of the Concordat, explain how we plan to implement it at the University of Brighton, discuss how it may affect you and your career development and provide an opportunity for you to contribute your ideas to the implementation plan.

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